Acculturation, internalizing mental health symptoms, and self-esteem: Cultural experiences of Latino adolescents in North Carolina

Paul R. Smokowski, Martica L. Bacallao

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    154 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This investigation examined acculturation risk factors and cultural assets, internalizing behavioral problems, and self-esteem in 323 Latino adolescents living in North Carolina. Multiple regression analyses revealed two risk factors-perceived discrimination and parent-adolescent conflict-as highly significant predictors of adolescent internalizing problems and low self-esteem. Adolescents who were highly involved in Latino culture and who experienced high parent-adolescent conflict were found particularly at risk for internalizing problems. Biculturalism and familism were cultural assets found associated with fewer internalizing problems and higher self-esteem. For internalizing problems, familism's protective effect was mediated by parent-adolescent conflict. Implications were discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)273-292
    Number of pages20
    JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
    Volume37
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 2007

    Keywords

    • Acculturation
    • Adolescents
    • Internalizing problems
    • Latinos
    • Self-esteem

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

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