Race and Student-Athlete Status: Peer Appraisals of Academic Skills, Intelligence, and Favorability

Alisia G.T.T. Tran, Jenny Holzapfel, Christina K. Lam, Kristi L. Eustice

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This online experimental study examined the roles of race and student-athlete status in college student perceptions of peers’ academic and intellectual skills and favorability. College student participants (n = 376) were randomly assigned to view a photograph (i.e., Black student-athlete, Black non-student-athlete, White student-athlete, White non-student-athlete) then rated the academic skills, intelligence, and favorability of the respective condition target. Moderation analyses revealed that White student-athletes were appraised as having higher study skills, academic motivation, and problem-solving abilities than White non-student athletes. Moreover, Black student-athletes were rated as less intelligent and less favorable than Black non-student athletes. Results suggest student-athlete status may be an advantage for White studentathletes, but a disadvantage for Black student-athletes in terms of peers’ academic, intelligence, and favorability appraisals relative to same-race, non-athlete peers. Findings imply that Black and White student-athletes likely face different campus experiences, wherein student-athlete status may pose risks of prejudiced peer evaluations and a potentially hostile campus climate for Black students.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)346-355
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Diversity in Higher Education
    Volume16
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 2 2021

    Keywords

    • favorability
    • intelligence stereotypes
    • peer evaluations
    • race
    • student-athletes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education

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